EL CICLOPE EURIPIDES PDF

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Cyclops by Euripides. Cyclops by Euripides ,. Heather McHugh Translator. David Konstan Translator.

Based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves can properly re-create the celebrated and timeless tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, the Greek Tragedy in New Translations series offers new translations that go beyond the literal meaning of the Greek in order to evoke the poetry of the originals.

Under the general editorship of Pete Based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves can properly re-create the celebrated and timeless tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, the Greek Tragedy in New Translations series offers new translations that go beyond the literal meaning of the Greek in order to evoke the poetry of the originals. Under the general editorship of Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro, each volume includes a critical introduction, commentary on the text, full stage directions, and a glossary of the mythical and geographical references in the play.

Brimming with lusty comedy and horror, this new version of Euripides' only extant satyr play has been refreshed with all the salty humor, vigorous music, and dramatic shapeliness available in modern American English. Driven by storms onto the shores of the Cyclops' island, Odysseus and his men find that the Cyclops has already enslaved a company of Greeks. When some of Odysseus' crew are seized and eaten by the Cyclops, Odysseus resorts to spectacular stratagems to free his crew and escape the island.

In this powerful work, prize-winning poet Heather McHugh and respected classicist David Konstan combine their talents to create this unusually strong and contemporary tragic-comedy marked by lively lyricism and moral subtlety.

Get A Copy. Paperback , 96 pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Cyclops , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Cyclops. Mar 14, Steve added it Shelves: greek , poetry , theatre. The sole complete and extant satyr-play, read in the translation of William Arrowsmith.

View 2 comments. May 06, Oblomov rated it it was ok Shelves: 1-do-not-piss-off-the-gods. Unlike the gory hilarity of the Bacchae , here Euripides intentionally wrote a comedy, and it is the only full Satyr play still in existence a burlesque type performance with a group of Satyrs replacing the usual chorus. As comedies go, Euripides is not quite up there with Aristophanes, and he should perhaps have stayed in his usual place on the comedy ladder: underneath it, so others may take the piss out of him.

The plot is taken from the well known Cyclops incident in The Odyssey : come to t Unlike the gory hilarity of the Bacchae , here Euripides intentionally wrote a comedy, and it is the only full Satyr play still in existence a burlesque type performance with a group of Satyrs replacing the usual chorus.

The plot is taken from the well known Cyclops incident in The Odyssey : come to the island for supplies, get kidnapped by a Cyclops, Noman, burning sticks, and Odysseus completely undermines this line from the beginning of his wikipedia article: Odysseus is renowned for his intellectual brilliance, guile, and versatility by deliberately revealing his true name as he escapes the injured and extremely peeved Cyclops.

A Cyclops who's Dad is Psoeidon. Psoeidon who is the God of the sea that Odysseus is currently sailing on. It's a nice example of the Greek's obsession with slapping down hubris, but it seems mightily out of place for a man lauded as some clever epic hero, both during the Odyssey and the Trojan War.

As for the comedy itself, Euripides is, again, no Aristophanes. The imprisoned shepherd and Satyr Silenus, who rats out Odysseus at the first sign of danger to himself and thus gets half the crew eaten, has a less funny and frankly more horrific comeuppance. Odysseus gets the Cyclops drunk so they can stab him in the soft part, but rather than quickly falling into a drunken slumber, the giant Cyclops grins at Silenus, proclaims him his Ganymede and proceeds to drag him into the cave.

Silenus, it seems, is saved before the Cyclops does a Zeus on him but its the most uncomfortable 'joke' here. This isn't my favourite Euripides.

There's no compelling moral quandries like in Medea , no likeably boisterous Hercules as in Alcestis and no series of roaringly gruesome, 'what the hell was that? There's just the argument of why eating people is wrong, which isn't really an intellectual conundrum most of us muse over, at least not until we truly hit the days of Soylent Green, and Odysseus' silver tongue is lost on the Cyclops anyway: an immovable, inhuman character that embodies amorality. A disappointment and I'm kind of glad I have nothing but Euripides' more meaty tragedies left to read.

It differs from our usual conception of Greek theatre, that of tragedies and catharsis and larger-than-life doomed heroes. It reads more as an ode to wine than as a mythical scene. Feb 23, Inkspill rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction-adventure-or-journey , script-for-stage-and-theater , fiction-comical-edge-or-fun-reads , fiction-horror-or-hair-raising , author-euripides , myth-odyssey-related.

After meeting a group of Satyrs and their father, Selenus, he meets the host and finds out. The host is Cyclops, Odysseus learns quickly how he applies the hospitality rules and has guests for dinner.

This play could be read as a comedy but really in strict Greek drama terms it is a satyr, the one that exists in its complete form. Based on the ninth book of The Odyssey , this loosely follows the same story, Odysseus makes his escape after telling Cyclops he is called no name and injures him after he gets him drunk on wine. The second difference is the satyrs and Selenus step in for other characters for Odysseus and Cyclops to exchange words with, this is done with comical affect.

So, reading this is a beginning for me to grasp this concept better. This translation was by Heather McHugh, and included an intro and notes by David Konstan, explaining what satyr plays are and how they fit into the annual drama festival, also touching on the importance of it.

Also, it gave a comparison between Homer and Cyclops, and suggested how this play would have been staged. All of which further added to my reading experience, where I walked away with a broader understanding than I was expecting. But the biggest surprise for me was -- Euripides writes comedy!!!

Having only read his weighty dramas I had no idea he did this. It was so neat to discover this. May 09, Alex rated it liked it Shelves: , rth-lifetime. The Cyclops' only claim to fame is that it's the world's only complete surviving Satyr play. In Athenian drama festivals, each playwright submitted four plays: a tragic trilogy and a concluding satyr play, which is a retelling of a classic myth with the addition of a bunch of dudes dressed as satyrs.

With boners. Boners were an integral ingredient of the satyr play. Euripides' luckily-saved satyr play is, as you may have guessed, a retelling of the famous episode from The Odyssey where Odysseus The Cyclops' only claim to fame is that it's the world's only complete surviving Satyr play.

Euripides' luckily-saved satyr play is, as you may have guessed, a retelling of the famous episode from The Odyssey where Odysseus fools the Cyclops and gets half his crew eaten in the process. It's fairly entertaining, I guess. I mean, I think we can all agree that most stories would be improved by having a bunch of drunks prancing around in the background with their boners out, whether or not that has anything at all to do with the plot. But it's not at all the best work Euripides did; it all seems pretty tossed off.

It also includes, by the way, a rape joke that gathered some attention a while back. Context: Polyphemus the cyclops gets Silenus the satyr drunk and then rapes him. Not because it's unusual - Greek drama is chock full of rape, both jokey and not - just because, I guess.

Here's a piece about it. The author concludes, I decided that Euripides, like Amy Schumer, was punching up. The Cyclops scene can be read as a trenchant joke digging into the intensely creepy origins of Athenian rape culture. It subtly calls into question the ethics of a common custom in Athens: the sexually-inflected mentorship of adolescents by older men.

And the fact that the rape is preceded by a mock-symposium goes even further, skewering the common sympotic custom of singing songs about desirable young boys. So anyway, a ten points for comparing Euripides to Amy Schumer, b trigger warning, and c let's just confirm that this is the official progenitor of this. I've been getting super sick of Paul Roche's translations, so I switched over to William Arrowsmith's for this one, and I liked it much better.

I even skimmed Roche's afterwards for comparison. Arrowsmith wins, although Roche's having ten plays in the same volume is still a pretty big advantage. View all 4 comments. Nov 11, David Sarkies rated it really liked it Shelves: comedy. Then again, the romance poets probably were more interested in romance in the form of pertaining to Rome as opposed to romance in the form of Mills and Boon. I seem to be drifting a bit here so I better get back on track.

Satyr plays are basically plays that would be performed after a trilogy of tragedies, and tended to be a lot more light hearted.

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