MAMIYA C330 PDF

When I discovered medium format with my Holga, a whole universe of photography was unveiled before my eyes. Soon I felt completely attracted to one type of camera, the twin lens reflex TLR. These cameras have two lenses — with one lens you see the image and do the focus; and with the other lens, the camera takes the photo. Among these cameras, the Mamiyas shone with a light of their own. I wanted to have one to see how those machines worked, so I decided to buy a used Mamiya C Professional I found online and I never regret it.

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My first encounter with medium format was about 40 years ago, when I bought a Heco Mar underwater housing. It held a Yashicamat twin lens reflex. There were troubles with the functioning of this camera, it had been flooded, so I never used it. I bought a replacement Yashicamat, but there were changes to be made to make it work in the housing and that never happened.

A TLR has a viewing lens which projects mirror reversed on a ground glass and a taking lens, which projects on film. Advantages are you have no viewfinder block out and you can screw any filter on the taking lens including a black infrared filter and you can see everything perfectly.

One day I want to the little used camera shop in the Jezusstraat, Antwerp, where I visited about once a month for no particular reason, you know? Never had a problem with G. This time it was a Mamiya C f professional with all seven lenses. He put on the 55mm, racked out the bellows all the way, and when I saw this camera did a reproduction ratio I was sold. Such started my medium format experience. With the Mamiya I took hundreds of shots on Fuji Velvia. After a few years I got more interested in rangefinders, bought the Mamiya 7 and gave the C system to a friend.

About a year ago I got an itch: I wanted the Mamiya C back! Grip and some filters and extra gridded ground glass included. They go from 55mm eq. These lenses are very good. The legend goes that the first generation of these lenses was too sharp and wedding photographers complained to Mamiya, whereupon the company made them a little softer. The especially is remarkable.

A TLR as said has a viewing lens and a taking lens. When you get close, you have parallax. Because of bellows extension less light reaches the film which you have to correct for. In the viewfinder a bar shows correction factor and where the top of the image is, so you can focus and recompose using your imagination. With the 55 and the 80, the camera focuses very close to reproduction ratio.

This is sort of unique in medium format. Then a large part of the image disappears. I have almost no problem with this. Tripod only. I never used it. You absolutely need to read the manual for this camera! No light meter, completely mechanical. I bought a tiny Gossen Digisix 2. Handling the camera came completely natural to me, no problem at all with the mirror reverse, which somehow makes for better, more careful composing. The square format is calm, balanced and beautiful.

Sunset with Thunderstorm in the Sky. The 55mm has a very good reputation. They also say it is difficult to focus. Not so. The image on the ground glass gets dark in the edges, but I focus in the middle and recompose. The camera weighs 5. I do 20 mile, 7 hour walks with it.

I also sling it across my shoulder on bicycle trips. I always go with just one lens, no camera bag. Against the rain I carry a plastic grocery bag. Usually on a walk I carry three films.

Received it today! This is the best film RF camera ever. Full review coming soon! For now, here is a video I did right after it arrived. The Hasselblad X1Dc. Medium Format Mirrorless and maybe the most awesome release of ! While I was ready to write off Hasselblad forever due to their huge blunders over the past couple of years […]. Great story, great images — very moody ones, including the last one.

But the C is lingering in my mind, and your post is so mouth watering… Thanks for sharing, I like the advanced, elegant style of your photography. I think the Mamiya C is more versatile, because I can get extremely close and make exact focus. An important part of why i bought it is te be able to make close ups.

Beautiful write up, camera an of course, images! Very inspiring. It is nice to see how it evoqued memories from another users. Thanks a lot! Really fond memories of this outfit. A bright viewfinder easily viewed. I loved the camera, the lenses, the concept, the built in bellows. The shutters being mechanical sometimes varied between lenses. One tested, one knew. Extremely sharp lenses, my mm for portraits reqd a piece of see thru tape permanently on. I needed to sell my images! The only drawback was when it was taken out the studio..

I needed a strong assistant.. I hated it with a passion.. I prefer the Mamiya c c33 or even the original. Brings back memories of my Mamiya TLRs. Started with the and ended with the Cf. Never had all seven lenses; think I maxed out at four. I had and used the paramender as well.

Moved on to Mamiya 6 and 7 rangefinders, and then a Rollei 2. Always liked the ground glass viewing. I remember the viewfinder as being closer to 6X6cm. Thanks for posting. I have two CS bodies and various lenses. When out walking I use a small ish Billingham bag with both bodies, one fitted with a 55mm and the other with a mm f3. Awesome camera, good set of pictures. Very nice! I have the CS in a peli case somewhere.

You also mistyped the size of the screen. So 4 inches is about correct. Always like your articles! For action you can prefocus and open up a hole in the front of the chimney above the screen. I mistyped the weights. Latest Posts. Be back in late July. Sale starts today. What about the camera industry? Switch to about I knew that would cost money! So, now. I have the 55, 80 and mm, equivalent to 28, 50 and about a hundred mm in Full Frame.

To get this reading correct, you have to dial in the lens you use in the body: With the 55 and the 80, the camera focuses very close to reproduction ratio.

Sunset with Thunderstorm in the Sky 55mm The 55mm has a very good reputation.

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Mamiya C330

My first encounter with medium format was about 40 years ago, when I bought a Heco Mar underwater housing. It held a Yashicamat twin lens reflex. There were troubles with the functioning of this camera, it had been flooded, so I never used it. I bought a replacement Yashicamat, but there were changes to be made to make it work in the housing and that never happened. A TLR has a viewing lens which projects mirror reversed on a ground glass and a taking lens, which projects on film. Advantages are you have no viewfinder block out and you can screw any filter on the taking lens including a black infrared filter and you can see everything perfectly. One day I want to the little used camera shop in the Jezusstraat, Antwerp, where I visited about once a month for no particular reason, you know?

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The Mamiya C330, a dream camera By Dirk Dom

The Mamiya C Professional is a traditional film twin-lens reflex camera introduced in the s for the professional and advanced amateur photography markets. The later Cf is an improvement on the C and was succeeded by the CS with further improvements. The Mamiya C-series cameras are one of the very few twin-lens reflex cameras with interchangeable lenses , along with the Koni-Omegaflex and Zeiss Contaflex. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article does not cite any sources.

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